May’s Books #Book Reviews

I can already tell you that this month will not be an epic month like last month! But I can assure you what I read was quality! Are you ready to find out? Nine books, is still pretty respectable, isn’t it?

The Road She Left Behind

The Road She Left Behind by Christine Nolfi

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Christine Nolfi has penned a beautiful story here, dealing with family, secrets, loss, discovery and forgiveness.
I was swept into the life of Darcy Goodridge straight away, intrigued by why this woman was on the run from her past, her old life, for the last eight years.
Over the first few chapters, the story unfolded and we were introduced to characters who you fell in love with. Samson, the ray of sunshine who attaches himself to Darcy, despite her not wanting reminders of any pasts she has forgone, Rosalind, Darcy’s mother, a scary character, who is full of misconceptions. Emerson, the nephew she left behind – but who is crying out for a mother’s love, and Michael. Darcy’s childhood best friend who she had to leave behind – twice.
A wonderful tale filled with twists and turns, and secrets that prove you shouldn’t really hide things you think you know… because they may just not be the truth…
Many thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishers for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
Published – 11th June

The Things I Know

The Things I Know by Amanda Prowse

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
I do love Amanda Prowse and her books. Ever since I read the first one, I have been hooked, and I was really looking forward to this new one.

Delving into the mind and world of Thomasina, or Hitch, as she is known, and reading about her meeting Grayson, and falling in love, felt like a privilege.

I have to commend Amanda for executing the nuances of this novel with such sympathy and grace. The thoughts and feelings of someone with a disability, but a person who is like everyone else, someone who wants her own life, and to be able to do everything others do, without the limitations that have been imposed upon her by her own loved ones.

That, and her capture of a person on the spectrum, someone whose thought process is so very different to the majority of the world.

And their love story.

I was hooked. I loved Pops and Mum, and I adored Thom and Gray!

One of my favourite quotes from the book – ” I like the way you care for my daughter and, for the record, I happen to agree with you. I think she’s pretty perfect too.” Thomasina’s Pops.

There’s a lesson in this – in the end, anything is possible – you just have to make that first step towards change.

Many thanks to NetGalley, Amazon Publishing and Amanda Prowse for an ARC, in exchange for an honest review.

Published 11th June

An Unsuitable Woman

An Unsuitable Woman by Kat Gordon

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Just seeing Kenya in the description was enough for me to want to read the book!

You see, my family, both my parents were born in Kenya to Indian Immigrant parents, and I have spent many a summer going there to visit.

It was great to read names of places and to be able to picture them and to know the names of the tribes mentioned, and the descriptions of some of the places, and animals…

But I’ll tell you a secret… I was never told of the Happy Valley set, and the indulgence, and the debauchery!

This story is set between the years of 1925 and 1937, following the life of 14-year-old Theo Miller who moves to Kenya with his family for his father’s job heading the railways. He gets caught up in the antics of Freddie and Sylvia, and their little Happy Valley band, wanting to be accepted by them, and dreaming of being just like them. ( I must ask my parents if they were aware of the goings on of the Happy Valley Set… My mum went to a British boarding school out there, so you never know…)

Though his thinking is not always aligned with theirs: their views of British supremacy, and how they are making the lives better for the natives, by keeping them in their place clash with Theo’s sister Maud, who is appalled by the double standards, choosing to try and fight for natives rights and those of the natural farmers in the area.

An interesting read.

Many thanks to NetGalley, Harper Collins UK and Borough Press for providing me with an ARC. in exchange for an honest review.

Published 31st May

Stories for South Asian Supergirls

Stories for South Asian Supergirls by Raj Kaur Khaira

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
An absolutely wonderful, inspirational collection of biographies celebrating the South Asian superwomen out there, some already known and some lesser-known, but no less inspirational.
What a brilliant book to show our girls what they can aspire to be!

What Have I Done? (No Greater Love #2)

What Have I Done? by Amanda Prowse
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Another gripping story from one of my favourite authors, Amanda Prowse.
Not my favourite, but a good read nonetheless.
Kathryn Booker does something pretty despicable at the beginning of the book, but, as you get into the story and continue with her on her journey, you realise that she had a very good reason for acting as she did.
A woman caught in the web of domestic violence; both physical and mental abuse piled upon her, and the pressure of acting like the perfect, happy wife and mother to the rest of the world takes its toll.
Then finally, Kathryn becomes Kate again – the woman she was always meant to be.
I loved the build-up and the to-ing and fro-ing of the timeline so you gradually found pieces to the jigsaw of Kate’s life and saw how it led her to where she ends up.
That said, I was a little disappointed in her children, though they start to come through at the end, and then I wanted the story to carry on more, so I knew more about how the whole situation affected them and their relationship with their mother. A sometimes disturbing account of a woman’s journey through abuse and fighting her way out of it.

Three-and-a-Half Heartbeats (No Greater Strength, #6)

Three-and-a-Half Heartbeats by Amanda Prowse
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Another Amanda Prowse book means I know I need to gear up for a shed load of emotion, and this was no different.
It is always the case when I read a story about the loss of a child…
And I don’t mind admitting that I actually sat in the car, waiting for my son to finish his cricket training, reading this book, and had to wipe away tears…
Grace and Tom Penderfold have all they could want, a wonderful marriage, a beautiful home and a precious child, with Grace bringing in the income, and Tom being the amazing house husband and daddy… until tragic circumstances rip their child, Chloe, from them.
A heart-rending story exploring the changes that loss can wreak upon couples after the loss of a child, and also a story of hope.
The added benefit of educating the readers about the dangers of a potentially fatal condition, Sepsis, makes this a truly gripping read.
Having had to have emergency surgery 13 years ago because of the possibility of septicemia, this hit home even harder.
Definitely a recommended read.

The Other Half of Augusta Hope

The Other Half of Augusta Hope by Joanna Glen

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I started to read this debut novel from Joanna Glen, but one thing I can tell you. I was not left disappointed at all.

We follow the story of Augusta Hope, one half of a set of twins: Julia and Augusta – two girls born on either side of midnight July 31st, meaning on was born in July and the other in August.

As can be the case, the girls were polar opposites in many ways, from appearances and personalities to likes and interest, but they still had that twin pull.

We are taken to Burundi as well, a little known African country, which has captured Augusta’s interest from a young age, and meet Parfait and his family, caught in a country suffering from bloodshed.

How the lives and stories of these two characters intertwine, is a testament to the brilliance of the author, and I did wonder… ‘Who actually was the other half of Augusta Hope?’ at the end.

Definitely a recommended read.

Many thanks to NetGalley, Harper Collins UK and Borough Press for granting me a wish with this ARC, in exchange for an honest review.

Published 13th June

Half a World Away

Half a World Away by Mike Gayle
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Maybe I should be ashamed to admit this, but Half a World Away is actually my first Mike Gayle book.

And I’m pretty sure it won’t be my last.

What a journey I went through, reading this story of Kerry and Noah, two extremely different individuals who are linked in the most basic of ways – by blood.

Life caused these two siblings to be separated,

We have Kerry bumping through life on the low roads, through foster care and children’s homes, before finally living an independent life, becoming a mother to Kian, but never forgetting her baby brother, who was separated from her.

Then there is Noah, cruising along the highroads, married, a barrister, a father, and living a life far removed from his real beginnings

The reason that Kerry finally reaches out to her brother is revealed slowly, and in such a manner that it makes the readers heart break.

I don’t want to go into the details, but I was hooked. it didn’t take me long to become fully immersed in Kerry and Noah’s story, and accompanied by tissues, snacks and copious cups of tea, I finished the book in a haze of emotions.

Many thanks to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton for providing me with an ARC, in exchange for an honest review.

Published 13th June

Becoming Dad

Becoming Dad by J. C. W. Helmkamp
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A highly descriptive account of a journey through both the seas and fatherhood.
Reading this, I could picture the scenes, smell the salt (and diapers, on occasion) and taste the whiskey that William encounters on his sailing journey of a lifetime, connecting him with his father, and allowing him to reminisce about becoming a dad.
It’s good to read of a man who isn’t afraid to show emotion too!
Definitely worth reading to find out whether William reaches his destination, and how he handled early fatherhood, and beyond!

And there you have it!

I shall be reading more, between writing reports and finally getting to that edit of mine, so chat soon!

Have you read any of the above? Let me know!






March’s Books #BookReview

And we are ending the third month of the year… how many did I manage to read this time? I know it was much less than the last two, but what with parents evenings, moderations and observations, I was falling asleep holding my books or kindles this month! Still, I made another small dent in my Goodreads challenge! And some that I read were from authors I know from the Blogisphere, like Geoff Le Pard and Vashti Quiroz-Vega. One book in particular, I found really hard to read, it took me nearly two weeks, so the numbers are much less…

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The Perfect Betrayal

The Perfect Betrayal by Lauren North

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Wow!
What a twist!
Grief can affect a person in many ways, and losing your partner, your soulmate and loved one can tip you over the edge, and boy was Tess tipped when her husband Mark was killed in a horrific plane accident.
The effect his loss has on the life of Tess and all those around her is horrific. The paranoia, the needing to keep her son Jamie safe, the suspicions of those who were trying to help….
And I won’t mention the ending but what I can say is that as soon as I read it, I sat bolt upright and was in shock… I hadn’t expected that twist AT ALL!
Brilliantly written and hugely captivating.
Many thanks to Random House UK and NetGalley for offering me an arc in exchange for an honest review.

Life In A Flash

Life In A Flash by Geoff Le Pard

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Geoff Le Pard has done it again!
I loved his Life in a Grain of Sand and Life in a Flash was no different, with a whole heap of flash fiction tales that make you laugh, cry, cringe and sigh.
Often short 500 word pieces, this is a book you can devour in one sitting, or pick up at will, and read a whole story in a snippet!

Life in a Conversation

Life in a Conversation by Geoff Le Pard

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
When life gives you lemons, go find Geoff Le Pard’s short stories and you’ll forget to suck on the lemons, but instead, cut them up and pop a slice into a G & T, sit back and enjoy the ride through Le Pard’s fantastical mind!
Small snippets of stories that range from emotional to hysterical to pure silliness.
Go read.
Enjoy!

Son of the Serpent (Fantasy Angels Series Book 2)

Son of the Serpent by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Loved it!
I read the first in the series, The Fall Of Lilith and really enjoyed the story, and was excited to read this sequel.
I was NOT disappointed!
We follow Dracule, son of Lilith and Satan, abandoned as a babe by his mother – his father disappeared.
Reading about his struggle to control the evil that appears to be within him, and trying his hardest to always do good was a page-turner.
I loved the familiar biblical characters that were woven into the story, giving a different sense of realism to the mythical story.
You really should read, not just this, but the first book too!

M for Mammy

M for Mammy by Eleanor O’Reilly

My rating: 3 of 5 star
M for Mammy sounded like a truly intriguing read.
It covers some pretty important issues, such as Autism and having a stroke.
I was really quite excited to read it, but sadly I found it very hard to follow because of the disjointed nature of the set-out.
I understand the three viewpoints were important, and the thoughts of an autistic child, Jacob, would be all over the place, and again the way we were put in the mother Annette’s shoes, who has suffered a stroke, and all the confusion your mind goes through. Then we had Jenny, a young girl who is battling through trying to understand life, her brother and an absent mother.
Three very different ways of thinking, and the premise was really clever. But I just got confused!
I loved Granny and would have liked to know her more.
I wish I could rate more, but it took me so long to read, because I couldn’t engage, therefore my rating is as such.

Many thanks to NetGalley, Two Roads and John Murray Press for an arc, in exchange for an honest review.

The Rosie Result (Don Tillman, #3)

The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Having read the previous two books, I was looking forward to this, the conclusion of the series, and I was definitely not disappointed!

Geneticist, Don Tillman is back with his family – wife, Rosie and son Hudson.

And they are back in Melbourne after 10 years in New York.

I always find any book that deals with people on the spectrum extremely interesting, and this was a humdinger of one!

Reading about how Don, who has Aspergers, ends up nearly sacked from his new job, due to his social ‘inadequacies’, reading situations wrong, and thinking rather laterally, rather than with the emotion that a neurotypical person would, was done in an extremely funny, yet sensitive way.

I love how Rosie interacts with him, knowing his quirks and traits, gently reminding him of how he should be reacting to situations.

It was great to follow his journey through his next project, which was to guide his son, Hudson, through a particularly tough transition from his US school to his new one in Australia. Don recognises many similarities between his own school life, and that of his son’s, and his sole aim is then to coach his son through school, teaching him acceptable behaviours and emotions, especially after the Head and Hudson’s class teacher are convinced he should go through testing to see if he has Autism.

I don’t want to go into a lot of detail, I hate to leave spoilers, so I will leave you with this.

It’s a great read, handling a sensitive topic with delicacy and humour, and an extremely satisfying end to an all-round fantastic series!

Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin UK – Michael Joseph for an arc of this book.

Releases April 4th 2019

Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful by Nina Stibbe

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
What a delightful read!

This was the first of Nina Stibbe’s books that I have read and I really enjoyed it. A light-hearted read that left you feeling good.

I have to say, as the daughter of a dentist whose family lived in a large flat about the surgery, there were some scenes that really had me giggling, like JP rushing upstairs for a quick toilet visit, or nap… like my dad!

The characters were well formed, and I loved Lizzie and her quirks.

And I have also been made aware of the fact that there are two previous books about Lizzie… may just have to get them as well…

Many thanks to NetGalley, Penguin Books (UK) and Viking for providing me with an arc, in exchange for an honest review.

So, seven books this month!

I have the Easter holidays soon, so I hope to read plenty in that time!!

What are you reading?



January’s Books #BookReview

January has flown by, don’t you think?

And in that time I have managed to devour eleven (yes, that’s ELEVEN!) books.

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I can thank my mile-long TBR list, as well as some fantastic new manuscripts that NetGalley approved for me to be an ARC reader!

Now I’m just going to pop a little photo here to show you what I have been reading…

See.

Told you I’d been busy! There was, of course, a reason for my ability to read so much, during term time. I credit that to a horrible sickness bug that rendered me prone to my bed, when not hugging the lavatory… but you don’t want to know about that!

So, the books.

I am giving you my reviews and a link to my GoodReads review, and if not available yet, a publication date.

Queenie Malone's Paradise Hotel

Queenie Malone’s Paradise Hotel by Ruth Hogan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My first book by Ruth Hogan, and I really enjoyed it.
A tale of a mother and a daughter, told by one person, but two perspectives.
Tilly the young girl, and Tilda the adult.
Queenie Malone’s Paradise Hotel is a story about ghosts. Past and present, and the ability to see them. Their ability to help a confused young woman to see her past more clearly, and her present and future with no regrets.
A touching read that made me think a little of Sixth Sense!

Many thanks to NetGalley and Two Roads books for allowing me to have an arc in exchange for my honest opinion.

Published 07/02/19

Stories from the Heart: Seven Short Stories

Stories from the Heart: Seven Short Stories by Amanda Prowse

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A beautiful set of short stories from a favourite author of mine!
Great to dip into when you can’t commit to a longer book, but want something that will give you that tingle.


Wildflower Heart (The Wildflower House #1)

Wildflower Heart by Grace Greene

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Wildflower Heart is the first of Grace Greene’s books that I have read, and I was far from disappointed.

A story of a damaged woman, scarred, physically and emotionally, from situations in her life, including the disappearance and subsequent death of her mother, and then the loss of her husband, in a gruesome accident which injured her as well.
After a long time she finds herself healing in some way, due to Wildflower House, the project her father buys as his forever home, in his retirement.
I don’t want to go into too much detail, but suffice to say, I felt sadness, joy, anger, frustration and hope whilst reading.
I am now keenly awaiting the sequel, wanting to know what happens next in Kara’s Wildflower journey!

Many thanks to NetGalley, and Grace Greene for the Arc, in exchange for an honest review.

In at the Deep End

In at the Deep End by Kate Davies

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’m not quite sure what I was expecting when I requested this book, but I have to say I was intrigued… I did have to read it in small spurts rather than in one or two sittings, as some areas were rather graphic!
I certainly have more of an idea about particular erotic activities now!
And I definitely had to be careful that my child wasn’t trying to read over my shoulder!
A sometimes funny, sometimes uncomfortable read, but a page-turner, nonetheless!

Published 21/02/19

Once Upon a River

Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

An interesting concept but a bit slow for me. Thanks to Netgalley for an arc in return for an honest review.

The Ballad of Sean and Wilko

The Ballad of Sean and Wilko by Paul Charles

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
A detective, murder mystery kind of vibe. Not really my sort of usual read. Engaging enough, but not the best, for me.

Beautiful Broken Things

Beautiful Broken Things by Sara Barnard
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Engaging. A story of friendship, abuse and support.

Fierce Fragile Hearts

Fierce Fragile Hearts by Sara Barnard

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Okay, so yesterday I spent the day reading Pretty Broken Things in anticipation of reading Fierce Fragile Hearts, and I am glad I did.

What a touching, often heart-wrenching story, told, this time, from the viewpoint of Suzanne, a victim of childhood abuse.

We experience the maturing of a friendship between three girls growing into women, and share with Suzanne the slow acceptance of what happened, and how she learns to deal with the cards life dealt her, all the time, an inner strength growing within her.

I really enjoyed reading this book and devoured it in a few hours.

Thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for providing me with an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

What Happens in France: A laugh out loud romantic comedy that will touch your heart

What Happens in France: A laugh out loud romantic comedy that will touch your heart by Carol Wyer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
I literally read this in the space of two sittings in one day!

An easy to read story about Bryony Masters, who is trying desperately to find her older sister who ran away when she was a little girl.

I loved how it was kept lighthearted, with the manner in which she decides to find her sister, and the antics of her and the great characters who support her.

Of course, there is a love interest to keep the romantics among us happy too.

And Biggie Small, the pug – what an adorable character! I wanted to be able to pet him myself and take selfies too!

With thanks to Netgalley and Canelo for this ARC in exchange for an open and honest review

Not Our Daughter!: The true story of a daughter-in-law

Not Our Daughter!: The true story of a daughter-in-law by Kalbir Bains

My rating: 2 of 5 stars
I wish I could give this more but I’m sorry. I can’t.
A sad story, but I felt annoyed so much. This happening in the 2000s… It feeds on all the stereotypes of an arranged marriage.
I wanted Harleen to get a backbone.
And the editing… Not good.

Enchantée

Enchantée by Gita Trelease

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
What a beautiful book!
I was most definitely Enchantée!
I do love a bit of historical fiction. Add a dash of magic, a sprinkling of romance and a splash of conflict, and you have a most wonderful, and (sorry to use the word again) enchanting story.
I have heard an awful lot about this book and seen it in the ‘to be read’ piles of a few others I follow and was so grateful to have been given the opportunity to read something so magical in advance.
The story of Camille and her sister, left bereft by the death of their parents, with a brother sinking deep into debt, and the claws, of a mysterious debtor, kept me gripped.
Weaving in the revolution, the beauty of Paris, the mystique of Versailles and the pure magic of those who had the knowledge, the story captivated me.
I was, of course, bowled over by the dashing Lazare – a hero who had morals as well as looks.
There are a host of secondary characters who intrigue a reader too,
Recommend it? Yes, definitely!

Many thanks to NetGalley and Pan Macmillan for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Published 21/02/19

And there you have it.

Lots of Ritu Reads, sometimes recommends, sometimes not!


#BookReview – Oath Keeper by Shelley Wilson @ShelleyWilson72

Another great book I finished in one night. In fact, I was up until 5am finishing it (long story as to why I was up that late, but still, I got great reading time, and thanks to being mum, I was up as usual, because, well, kids – you know!)

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I read Shelley’s Oath Breaker when it came out, and I mentioned how werewolves and I didn’t really mix, but that Shelley had converted me… (read that review here) So I was really excited when the sequel to her book was finally announced!

So first, the blurb…

She chose the pack. But does the pack still want her?

Mia Roberts is struggling to fit in with the Ravenshood pack. Although her brother is an alpha, he’s not even convinced she has the werewolf gene. If she’s not a wolf or a hunter, then what is she? 

The answers lie inside Hood Academy. But when children in the wolf community start shifting too soon, Mia worries that her hunter father may be responsible.

She wants to help her pack, but she also needs answers. Can she keep her brother from killing her father long enough to find out who she really is?

Loyalty, friendships, and family bonds are tested as Mia steps into her power and discovers her true identity.

And my thoughts…

I had a while to wait for the sequel to Oath Breaker to arrive, and when it did, I was not disappointed!
Reading about Mia and her turmoil during her discovery of her own from was so realistic, I was feeling the pain at times!

We are reunited with Mia, Zac, Cody, Elizabeth, Sebastian et al, and see them battling the evils that are the Parker Family, with some new twists thrown in. Can they save the werewolves?
Will Hunters and Werewolves ever be able to live side by side in peace?
Will she be able to finally be an Oath Keeper?
Well, I’m not telling you that!
I’m only saying that you need to read the book to find out, and if you haven’t read the first, make sure you read that too!

Read my Amazon review here

Read my Goodreads review here

Buy it here

Oath Keeper (Hood Academy Book 2) by [Wilson, Shelley]

Check out Shelley’s Amazon page here.

And her bookshop here. Shelley is not only a fantastic YA author but a wonderful motivational writer too.

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If you want to know more about Shelley Wilson, click here for her full bio and media kit!

10 Steps To Hero – How to Craft a Kickass Protagonist by Sacha Black #BookReview @sacha_black

I’m really not one for reading texts for how to improve your writing.

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It’s not that I don’t think I need them, but I often feel that if someone is telling me how to write, then what I churn out is not really my voice, but that of another…

Having said that, I have read a few recently, by trusted authors, some who I feel I know, some whose name I have grown up with… Stephen King, Karen McQuestion, Bryan Cohen, Nicola Morgan, Sacha Black…

And they haven’t been telling me what to write, rather how to go about the process, sometimes how they started off, in order to reach the heights they have climbed.

Sacha Black is definitely one of those authors.

Hers was actually the first ever writing craft book I read actually.

When she released her guide to creating villains, I had to get it. Partly because I had been with her step by step, via the blog, as she wrote it, and partly because she always sounds like she knows what she’s talking about!

And I wasn’t disappointed! Read my review here.

And after that, she couldn’t leave it at one book, so on top of writing two parts to her YA series, she created a guide to create a fantastic hero character too!

So, the blurb…

From cardboard cut-out to superhero in 10 steps.

Are you fed up of one-dimensional heroes? Frustrated with creating clones? Does your protagonist fail to capture your reader’s heart?

In 10 Steps To Hero, you’ll discover: 

+ How to develop a killer character arc

+ A step-by-step guide to creating your hero from initial concept to final page

+ Why the web of story connectivity is essential to crafting a hero that will hook readers

+ The four major pitfalls to avoid as well as the tropes your story needs

Finally, there is a comprehensive writing guide to help you create your perfect protagonist. Whether you’re writing your first story or you’re a professional writer, this book will help supercharge your hero and give them that extra edge.

These lessons will help you master your charming knights, navigate your way to the perfect balance of flaws and traits, as well as strengthen your hero to give your story the conflict and punch it needs.

First, there were villains, now there are heroes. If you like dark humor, learning through examples, and want to create the best hero you can, then you’ll love Sacha Black’s guide to crafting heroes.

Read 10 Steps To Hero today and start creating kick-ass heroes.

So…

Did it help me?

I gotta say YES!

For the first time, since reading these kinds of books, I was inspired to get a pen and paper, any paper, and jot down ideas to hopefully improve my characters, and their reasoning behind doing some of the things they do in my own book!

I’m weaving my own web of connectivity, creating character arcs, looking through my hero lens… (you’ll need to read it to get what all those are!) And all with the help of this rather cool guide that is rather funny too. Sacha is like me, she tends to create her own words, to describe things. She’s not afraid to say it like it is either.

And would I recommend it to other aspiring writers?

Absolutely!!!

My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Buy it by clicking books2read.com/10stepstohero

Reviewed on Goodreads and Amazon.

And not only does Sacha write these amazing badass craft guides, but she even manages to write accompanying workbooks too!

You know you wanna buy…

If you don’t know Sacha, why not?

She is blogging event organiser extraordinaire, being the birth mother of the Annual Bloggers Bash and Awards, and an author of four books, two fiction, and two non-fiction, with more due soon! And she is a loving wife and mother too, to top it off!

Sacha Black has five obsessions; words, expensive shoes, conspiracy theories,  self-improvement, and breaking the rules. She also has the mind of a perpetual sixteen-year-old, only with slightly less drama and slightly more bills.
Sacha writes books about people with magical powers and other books about the art of writing. She lives in Hertfordshire, England, with her wife and genius, giant of a son.
When she’s not writing, she can be found laughing inappropriately loud, blogging, sniffing musty old books, fangirling film and TV soundtracks, or thinking up new ways to break the rules.

Find out more about Sacha and her books here.

I do love Sacha, she has been ace at giving me, ahem, gentle nudges when it came to getting that first draft finished too!

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